Spring has sprung! For some of us, that means gardening season is finally here. As you head outdoors into your garden to clip fresh flowers or plant new bulbs, it’s important to know there are certain plants, flowers, and fertilizers that are toxic to our furry friends.

Spring Toxicities in Dogs:

  • Ingesting spring flowers with bulbs, including tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, buttercups, and jonquils, can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea in dogs. Larger amounts even have the ability to cause increased heart and respiratory rates and foreign body obstructions.
  • Organic fertilizers made of blood and bone meal can cause vomiting and diarrhea in our canine companions if they ingest large amounts while digging in the garden. Not to mention, bone meal can form a large cement-like bone ball in the stomach, often requiring surgical intervention.

Spring Toxicities in Cats:

  • While there are some benign lilies, many of the common spring varieties are quite toxic to our feline friends. The pollen, stems, leaves, and even water in a vase can lead to severe kidney failure. Signs of lily poisoning include diarrhea, vomiting, lethargy, and seizures.
  • Crocus plants, especially the spring crocus, have the ability to cause gastrointestinal issues such as vomiting and diarrhea in cats. Signs may be seen immediately but can be delayed for several days.

While many pesticides or insecticides are usually not a major concern in dogs and cats, some can contain an organophosphate that can be life-threatening if consumed in large quantities. Always talk with a gardening professional when using any pesticide or insecticide if you have a pet in the home.

Pet-proof your garden to help keep your fur baby happy and healthy all spring. If your pet does get its paws on a dangerous plant, flower, or fertilizer, call the National Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435 or come immediately to our Emergency Room at 1325 Morris Ave. in Union, NJ. Our team is here 24/7.